Monday, 21 September 2015

Coydog community page

See: "Living with a coyote hybrid (Coydog)"


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This is Bandit, although, he also knows his very original nickname, Coyote. He is a rescue dog that is supposed to be Aussie/Queensland. He has the healer coloring, but his temperament and behavior is completely bizarre in terms of any dog behavior I have seen. He looks like a coyote, and has many traits pointing to the possibility of having coyote genes...he is approaching 2 years old.

MoonFire











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This is Oakley, a presumed Coydog living in the dairy state of Wisconsin. He’ll be 1 year old in March of this year (2019), his family is looking into DNA testing and the different lifestyle of raising a Coydog. He loves life with his 2 Labrador brothers!

Brittany Mayer





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Bella


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She showed up in my neighborhood in Puerto Penasco, Sonora, Mexico. I was there for 2 weeks during Christmas. The security guards called her Coyote Dog and that she had been hanging out for a few weeks. She was malnourished and her ribs were sticking out. She had also had recently weened pups as she still had enlarged breasts. She took to me and followed me every where and would jump the court yard fence if I left out the gate. I tried to get a vet appointment for her to get fixed and shots to take her across the border. Christmas in Mexico most businesses shut down for the holiday until Jan 7.  So, I was unable to get a vet appointment. I left her with a neighbor and went back to Arizona on Jan 2. I called numerous vets to get her in for an appointment. When I told one vet about her, he said he would take her on Sunday Jan 6 a holiday -- Three Kings Day or Epiphany.

So, she got fixed and all her shots and could now legally cross the border.  Since all Mexicans have long names, I decided to give her a Mexican name. Sonora Bella Rosa Lucita Cruz. Sonora (the state in Mexico) Beautiful Rose Little Lucy Cross. Her last name Cruz /Cross was important because she crossed over to a better life and she can legally cross the border. I already had a almost 2 yr. old Toy Australian Shepherd named Tucker in the US and goes by Tukito Rodrigo in Mexico. They got along instantly. Bella didn’t know what a dog toy was, and Tucker likes to play fetch and tug of war. We throw the toy on the roof of the house and Bella chases Tucker. She has learned if she has his toy in her mouth, he will chase her. During Christmas when I had her we gave her lots of food because she was so skinny and malnourished. She only ate till she was satisfied and would go bury the rest for later and use her nose to cover it up. Now that she eats regularly, she doesn’t do that any more. The sides and back of the house have a courtyard with 6 ft walls except one side where there is a gate to the front yard was only 3 ft tall. We had to build the wall taller (not Trumps wall) to keep her in. If I leave the courtyard, she would jump the wall to be with me. She doesn’t let me out of her sight. The first time with a collar and leash she was like a bucking bronco, so I got a harness. She now can use the collar, as soon as she sees the leash, she knows she is going for a walk.  She is very intelligent. She learned her name after calling her twice. She learned to sit with one treat. Where I live in Mexico every weekend is surrounded by coyotes. They come out of the desert and head to the beach every evening before sunset to look for food.  She knows they are there. She will run to the roof and bark and wag her tail.  Although I don’t think she was wild she had been with a family that had children. Christmas Eve at a neighbor’s their 15-month-old granddaughter pulled her ears and tail and it didn’t bother her. She doesn’t like the ocean whereas the other dog likes to swim.

She loves flowers. She can’t walk past any of my potted plants in the courtyard without stopping and looking. She likes bird watching. She lifts her head to watch the hummingbirds at the feeder or if other birds are flying by. She is passive around other dogs and has no aggression. These are pictures when she first showed up before Christmas. The Belgian Shepherd is the only short haired Shepherd and normally weigh around 50 plus lbs. She weighs 31 lbs and is almost 2 yrs. old.





Suanne
John's Coydog Community page

33 comments:

  1. To be honest I'm new at this breed first time I ever saw one and Thor (my coy-boy) is my buddy I love him I just wanna do great by him so yeah to my question >>>>>>>>>>>>
    >>>> How can I get my Coydog To listen to me and any reprimands I give and also any and every kind/type of instructions I give?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For specific problems, you might find some useful advice in the "Living with a coyote hybrid..." (link at the top of this page) and its comments, but generally it is good to keep in mind that unlike the wolf, the coyote has never been trained and has never sought to engage with humans in a mutually advantageous way.

      So it is mostly a matter of tempering the training one gives the dog part with being a family member to the coyote part. The coyote part likes to have a family and would not want to disappoint them so if you seem disappointed in something they have done, they will want to avoid that as much as possible, but any adversarial situation situation is not going to work very well, nor is working for treats. It's a balancing act between training a dog and being family to a coyote. It takes time and patience.

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  2. I rescued mine from a shelter. I had Cody Logan Micallef for 11.5 and had to put him down a week ago. This breed is incredible. If you have the opportunity to raise one you will not be disappointed. He was so smart, loyal, and friendly. When he was younger he use to sleep under the bed (like a coyote den), he was fearful of loud noises but never barked. He would howl. He communicated and understood the English language. He understood sentences. I had no problems with other dogs, kids, people - anything. The only problem I would have is people stopping me on every walk either asking what he was or saying how beautiful he was. They listen well and learn quickly. They don't like being in trouble and sense your energy. If they upset you its rare that they will repeat the behavior. Dog toys didn't work. He liked pinecones and sticks. He didn't even like dog treats so I never trained him with them. He knew how to sit before he crossed the street, I never had him on a leesh as this was very unnatural for him. He would stay no more than 3 feet away from me at all times unless we were running. My sister had children and he loved new borns. He was very protective of children or anything smaller than him. I trained him not to chase other animals and he learned so quickly. Honestly I wish I could find another. KNOW this hybrid is a rarity and a blessing. If you come across one they are more than just dogs. Being half wild they have a different spirit. Its incredible. Enjoy

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    1. Thank you for sharing this, Ania, and I am sorry for your loss, but it is obvious that Cody had a very happy life with you. What you say about them is absolutely true, they are much more than dogs but they also need people who are much more than just dog-owners too! I hope you will find another one soon (Tristan also sometimes sleeps under my bed).

      Best,

      John

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  3. Is this the community page?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, a little sparse, still, but anyone is welcome to send me photos of their coydog with any other material, personal or business details and I will post it here.

      Best,

      John

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  4. Love these animals! I have had one but never actually needed to train him for anything. I got him when I was 13 and remember the first time I realized he was not a dog... A mole had bit his nose one day after he had it cornered. I walked out the door the next morning to go to school and there were about 20 moles scattered around our porch. He had went on a mole hunting expedition... Some were even headless. Thankfully we lived in the country but yeah... They are not dogs. He was super proud of himself though :-)... So was I!

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    1. Vengeance! What a great story. No one messes with the coydog.

      Best,

      John

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  5. Hi...I think my white shepherd mix is a coydog hybrid. He is about 5 yrs old now and is BY FAR the best dog I have. I have two Pit/Lab mix pups that are 1 1/2 yrs old now. They are 3/4 Pit 1/4 lab.

    Maximus, Max, was rather apprehensive of the new pups but took to them rather quickly and became a "parent" to them quickly. He even dug a small hole, would place them in it and would place them in the void, cover them with his body and keep them warm in the winter. It was as if he saw they were short haired and had issues staying warmer in the winter.

    His personality is very intriguing. He will keep his distance from strangers and "circle" them, as if he is scanning for a weakness. He is definitely a "face licker" and has actually trained his adopted children to do the same. They also have developed is "vocabulary" for more high pitched greetings and communication as well.

    He is overly intelligent. I didn't know he was a hybrid when I got him as a puppy. I immediately began to recognize he had rather different mannerisms when he was around 1 month old and had to adapt. It took a VERY STRONG role as alpha, by me, to show him I was boss. Even after taking this role, he still tried to exude dominance and I basically had to forcefully show him I was boss. Shortly after, I had his testosterone reduced by having him neutered..,big difference in his demeanor after his hormone levels were reduced (may have been wrong of me, I don't know).

    His appearance was not what I figured a coydog would look like, As he is solid white. The physical appearances do you show the hybrid in him, especially with his aggressive stances and all of the hair on his back bristling up when threatened.

    He still shows his dominance with the pups.,,Bailey the larger of the two is not afraid of him though. She is rather strange looking with the size of a lab and the build of the pit bull with the very muscular frame and the block head. What is my nickname for her is blockhead. What is my nickname for her is blockhead. She and her sister are both spayed. She is extremely protective of my family. When she began to show aggression, immediately correct her. Her attitude completely changes after that. All of my good friends have been introduced to her and spend time with her therefore she is not aggressive towards them. That was my intent. However if you are stranger, you better not step foot in my backyard. On the other hand, Max is that way about my kids and wife. He is extremely protective and seems to be more so towards them than the others.

    Anyway, I just wanted to post about my wonderful coydog and the joy he is added to my families life.

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    1. Thanks for sharing that, Scott. Yes, indeed, coydogs are very protective of those whom they include in their family. Tristan like the woman who lives next door and will protect her territory, too. The other day she wanted to make a fuss of him and Tristan came over to me, first, and nuzzled my hand as if seeking permission. I gave it of course, and he ran over to get some more attention. That is very intelligent behavior!

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  6. One more thing...not dog related...What exactly is a Celtist? I'm a down south "Georgia Boy" LOL. I know my family is of Scottish decent. Actually, the McClure family were "teachers" in the MacLeod (McCloud) clan. The word "Lure" is derived from our name MacLuer, as falconry was taught and the item on the string you swing to entice the bird is called a "lure"'...same as fishing and so forth. I love genaology.

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  7. One more thing...not dog related...What exactly is a Celtic Nimismatis? I am fairly well educated (I am. Critical Care Paramedic) but still i am a down south "Georgia Boy" LOL. I know my family is of Scottish decent. Actually, the McClure family were "teachers" in the MacLeod (McCloud) clan. The word "Lure" is derived from our name MacLuer, as falconry was taught and the item on the string you swing to entice the bird is called a "lure"'...same as fishing and so forth. I love genaology.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. That's my specialty: Ancient Celtic Coinage.

      See my article: http://tinyurl.com/y7df68zs (scroll up a bit)

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  8. Very interesting stories from everyone. I do not have a coydog, however I was wondering if you've experienced any issues with the legalities of owning coydogs like those with wolf hybrids.

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    Replies
    1. Here, at least, there are no laws against owning coydogs.

      Best,

      John

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    2. I believe very strongly I have a coydog. We got her from a First Nations Reserve in a location out of town , in the country so to speak. They know mom is a Shepard x but don't know the father. She has many unusual traits, many of them as described by other writers. Willow will use her paws a lot in play and on her own. She always greets us with kisses on the face. This may sound strange but she doesn't 'smell' like other dogs. Her odor is quite different. She is very loving, loyal (has chosen me to be the one she follows everywhere) and seems emotional, pouts if I reprimand her, very intelligent. We love her dearly and will do our best to train her and love her as she settles in to being a loving part of our family.

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    3. Sorry for the delay, replying. I've been busy and not checking messages as much as I should. Sounds like you have a very nice coydog. Just remember that that they are family-oriented and not pack animals so dominance will not work very well. Just let her know when you are displeased by acting disappointed and she will probably do her best to rectify the situation.

      Best,

      John

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  9. Hello John!

    My name is Brittany and I know I’m late to the game on this post so I understand if you can’t reply.

    We were told our puppy was a Border ColliexGerman Shepard. The mom was the border collie. This was almost an “Amish” farm where the mother ran lose at all times, we are also in Wisconsin so in very close proximity to woods and coyote habitat. I often hear them yipping in the distance off the back of my porch at night in the summer.

    Regardless, his colors and stature most definitely represent a coyote and we often get that comment when we take him out in public.

    One of the most coyote characteristics that I believe he possesses is that he uses his his paws/front legs for pretty much everything, specifically playing. Which is very different from our other dogs.

    Another characteristic is that he greets everyone with his nose and licks. When he wants to smell something on you, he will not release his nose no matter how much pressure you use to push him away it seems.

    We are thinking of doing a DNA test. But it wouldn’t change anything.

    He is not the alpha male in the house, but it does make sense that his training is different from the Labradors. We almost thought he was “dumb” but it could be quite the opposite.

    He isn’t interested in fetch, but he does love chasing the ball and otherwise he just scopes the yard with his nose to the ground at all times.

    I’m just curious to how he will be around children in a few years when we start our family. I don’t have any concerns but I don’t know coyote instincts.

    Also wondering how your dog is doing, as it’s beem many years since the original post.

    I would love to share a picture I’m just not sure how on this post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry for the delay replying, Brittany as I'm not checking my blog too often these days.

      As coyotes are in family groups rather than packs like wolves and wild dogs, there should be no problems as he will quickly bond with the children.

      If you send the photo to john[at]writer2001.com (email address changed to confuse spam bots). I can post it here.

      Best,

      John

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    2. Forgot to mention, Tristan is doing well and becoming even more civilized -- he's even getting more tolerant around people who show fear or nervousness in his presence!

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  10. My 2 pitbuls and I ran into a pack of at least 10 Coyotes and Coydogs at New Brighton MN today. There were at least 2 short hairs in the pack. Very cool!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry for the delay replying, I have not been doing much with my blog lately, but I'm thinking of starting a weekly post so the delays in replying will end!

      That is very interesting, and I had never thought about Coyotes and coydogs associating in a pack (or large family group?) situation. It would be worth studying to see what behaviors become dominant.

      Best,

      John

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  11. My son got a dog from a friend of his, but was told it was a german shepheard mix the pup was about 3mo. old as the months pass he is 1yr old now. But i think he is some sort of wolf or coyote mix with a dog. He has killed already my sisters rabbit at the age of 4mo. Old, a few birds and small ridents. His front legs are narrow and long. could a dog have puppies with a wolf or a coyote is it legal? I think he might be a crossbreed of a dog and a coyote or a wolf.

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  12. My coydog, Akira, has become alarmingly protective over my other two dogs. IF she senses that another dog is "starting" anything she will pounce on it and put it down by its neck, never biting, but holding down. It is very frightening to everyone even though she has never bit. She is 3 and this just started about 6 months ago. I love that she loves her family, and responds well when called off, but is there any other advice of what to do so this doesn't happen?

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Sorry for the delay replying, I am not checking my blog as often as I should these days. Is there any incident that you can associate with the start of Akira's protective habit? That might give a clue to how to handle it.

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  13. Akira is growing into alpha position in your dog family. Aggression toward her small family including you is becoming her job to protect from in her head. This is a Matronly duty in the wild. You have to establish yourself in that position In the family, leaving her to be Beta after. Teach her to respond to the Command "OUT", and Bark it out curtly when you use it. Her response should be to stop what she is doing and pay attention to you. Once her attention is turned make her Come and sit. Bark, do not holler. Praise her when she does what you say. This establishes your Alpha. Never call her to you and then bless her down. That is negative and she will never respond properly after.

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  14. I am new to this page. I believe I have adopted a coy dog. He was a rescue from Mexico. I’ve owned and trained many dogs in my lifetime. And this boy is beyond smart and attached to me like no other. He has endless energy. I am just having a few issues that I wonder if anyone has had or has any suggestions. When anyone turns their back on him he punches that person in the knees, knocking their knees out. He seems to want to play. Dogs in the past I would used the method of turning my back on them to stop an undesirable behavior. But with Xico. He punches the knees out. Had anyone had this issue or any suggestions on how to stop this behavior. And do you all have issues with your dogs around other people besides your family. Xico tools months to be ok with others living in my home. He know loves and protects all of us. But seems very sketchy of meeting anyone new on a walk or anyone that comes to our home.

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    Replies
    1. Sorry for the delay in replying (as usual these days!)

      Xico certainly sounds like a coydog. Many of them will adopt habits that are unique to them and not typical of all coydogs. I think this is an indication of them being very intelligent. It does seem fairly typical that coydogs can take a while to be comfortable around a human newcomer, though they are often very friendly to other dogs when meeting them for the first time.

      All that I can suggest with his punching out people's knees, is to use whatever will register inappropriate behavior to him. I usually grab Tristan by the snout and gently shake it side to side a couple of times in the way that a mother dog will discipline a puppy. He understands this but coydog habits can often be rather OCD and tough to correct. Be patient.

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  15. I think my Coydog has joined a coyote pack, is this possible?

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    1. Coyotes are found as family groups but not packs as with wolves, so it seems unlikely. However, I know very little about what happens with a coyote mating with a stray domestic dog in the wild. In my area, that does not happen because the pups would most likely not survive their first winter as such matings happen not at the usual time for coyotes. Coydogs here are all the offspring of a domestic dog female and the pups are raised in homes.

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  16. I believe my Buster is a coydog. He was found abandoned as a pup, starving by a neighbor farmer. He has always been different, yips, eats grubs, kills rabbits, used to sleek into the woods and hide from cars and people though at 8 he is fine with them. When we got him I had 3 other dogs so he just became part of the pack He does lick the other dogs mouths .. Though the pack is down to 2 as they have aged and gone on. I'd love to send a picture, from some of these we think coyote golden lab..What do you think? We do have coyotes all around us, we hear them at night. He usually yip barks back but has howled which is a bit creepy

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  17. Sorry for the delays in these messages but I am not doing much blogging these days. Also, my webmail has been down for days, together with domains hosted by my ISP. Apparently some major piece of equipment has broken down further up the pipes.

    When things get fixed (hopefully very soon!) send photos to john[at]writer2001.com

    (email address altered to avoid spam bots)

    ReplyDelete